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MISKAT MILU
Apr 12, 2022
In Welcome to the Forum
Over the past few months, the world has changed in many ways. The Black Lives Matter movement has sparked much-needed dialogue about diversity and inclusion in the Latest Mailing Database workplace. Intercom responded by hiring a diversity and inclusion consultant, updating our recruiting strategy and hiring practices to reduce bias, scheduling ally training for all employees, and amplifying black voices in our podcast and our blog. We are very proud of the work Intercom has done to take a stand against racial injustice. And seeing this work come to fruition, Sam, product engineer at Intercom, was inspired to find other ways to get involved. We realized that the terminology we use in our code base at Intercom reinforced the very ideas we had decided to take a stand against. If there's one thing we know to be true, it's that words matter. And an astute knowledge of the language we use and its impact on those around us is essential for all of us as we move towards eliminating our own conscious and unconscious biases. As we thought of ways to Latest Mailing Database reduce bias in the workplace and do our part to fight racism, we realized that the terminology we use in our code base at Intercom reinforces the very ideas we decided to take a stand. So we took a closer look at the history of these terms and found a way to eliminate their use at Intercom in hopes of creating an inclusive and welcoming environment for all. The language we use shapes our world Sam experienced the lasting effects that words can have. As they say, “When I was fresh out of college, I was working at my first job in the tech industry. One day I arrived at a meeting a few minutes late after another meeting had passed. My team's lead engineer stopped what he was doing and announced to Latest Mailing Database the male-only room, “Looks like the token female engineer has arrived. (I introduced myself as a woman and used her pronouns at the time.) It hurt to be called a token ; what hurt me even more was that no one spoke for me. Years later, this memory sticks with me as a testament to the bystander effect and, more importantly, the power of words.
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MISKAT MILU

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